Things for Teachers

Post(s) tagged with "Twitter"

world-shaker:

Why Twitter is a Teacher’s Best Friend:
As a classroom teacher I remember going across the hall to ask Mr.  Sally for tips on getting kids to learn their times tables. His ideas  were fine, but what if I’d been able to crowdsource my question to the  global community of educators on Twitter? A teacher who engages with  other educators on Twitter essentially has a 24/7 open door policy. Type  the hashtag #edchat in the search box, and you’ll see a real-time  stream of discussion about an unlimited number of educational topics.  It’s pretty clear teachers are collaborating with each other by sharing  solutions to their challenges—links to articles, resources and practical  ideas:
(via Why Twitter Is a Teacher’s Best Tool - Education - GOOD)

world-shaker:

Why Twitter is a Teacher’s Best Friend:

As a classroom teacher I remember going across the hall to ask Mr. Sally for tips on getting kids to learn their times tables. His ideas were fine, but what if I’d been able to crowdsource my question to the global community of educators on Twitter? A teacher who engages with other educators on Twitter essentially has a 24/7 open door policy. Type the hashtag #edchat in the search box, and you’ll see a real-time stream of discussion about an unlimited number of educational topics. It’s pretty clear teachers are collaborating with each other by sharing solutions to their challenges—links to articles, resources and practical ideas:

(via Why Twitter Is a Teacher’s Best Tool - Education - GOOD)

10 Twitter Tips for Teachers ⇢

Purdue University, in Indiana, developed its own backchannel system, Hot Seat, two years ago, at a cost of $84,000. It lets students post comments and questions, which can be read on laptops or smartphones or projected on a large screen. Sugato Chakravarty, who lectures about personal finance, pauses to answer those that have been “voted up” by his audience.

Before Hot Seat, “I could never get people to speak up,” Professor Chakravarty said. “Everybody’s intimidated.”

“It’s clear to me,” he added, “that absent this kind of social media interaction, there are things students think about that normally they’d never say.”

- Students speak up in class, silently, via social media: NY Times

The New York Times

Twitter- Expanding the Classroom- Shrinking the World ⇢

Click through the link to read the rest of the guest post at Free Tech for Teachers.

Mr. Campbell saw that we were studying Greece and asked our class to help his class. His senior Western Civilization class had prepared Greek god reports and we were going to be judges. Through the use of Skype we sat in on some of their presentations. During the presentations, our students used the backchannel Todaysmeet.com. My 6th graders were excited to see other students’ work, talk with students in another state and oh by the way, learned a little more about Greek gods in the process. One of my students actually got to perform the song she wrote about Athena for her presentation to the class in Pennsylvania.

How 4 people & their social network turned an unwitting witness to bin Laden’s death into a citizen journalist ⇢

kenyatta:

How did he become so influential so quickly? How does anyone? It takes the right piece of information at the right time, passed across small overlapping social circles, starting with a few hundred people at a time, then increasing.

In this case, there are four key players. Two of them are a couple: a journalist who lives in New York and a social media specialist who lives in London. The other two have roots in Pakistan: a journalist and documentary filmmaker who recently moved to the U.S. and a political commentator in Islamabad.

Each of them contributed to a chain of information that turned one man’s offhand comments about a helicopter in the middle of the night into an internationally known work of citizen journalism.

via soupsoup

This is not something I would normally post, but it’s a very, very interesting read. I think you can make some connections here, as well, about the power of establishing a PLN (c’mon… you knew I had to link it to education somehow…)

Source: soupsoup

The Benefits of Social Media for Teachers ⇢

Richard Byrne posts about how he uses Twitter and social bookmarking. If you’re looking to make your life easier with social media, this post is a great place to start.

Stats that struck me: only 18% of educators use Twitter; only 4% use it to connect with other educators.

Stats that struck me: only 18% of educators use Twitter; only 4% use it to connect with other educators.

Source: edudemic.com

Now what?

roughdrafts1:

So I signed up for Twitter today. Now what do I do with it?

*****Panic***** 

I like these suggestions from an old TCI blog post…

When you are ready to begin, find the Twitter search box and type in the following, #edchat and click.  Scroll through the messages and begin looking at what these teachers post.  You will see folks often use a # sign in their tweets.  This allows the tweet to fall in a series of tweets that, when searched, will appear together in a timeline with the most recent post first.

* From the list of educators you see on #edchat, you can decide to follow a few.  I recommend a few: @shellterrell, @tomwhitby, and @kyteacher.  Please consider following me @Brian_ThomasTCI and our official account, @TeachTCI.  Spend the first few sessions you go onto Twitter just reading and consuming.  Don’t worry about posting yet.

* When you feel ready, post a tweet with a thought, question, or insight you have to classroom instruction.  Remember that tweets must be 140 characters or less.  Everything counts, spaces, dots, semi-colons.

* Participate in a live discussion.  For general education, there is none better I’ve found than #edchat on Wednesdays 12pm EST and 7pm EST.  Both last one hour.  The discussion revolves around a few essential questions that educators from around the country discuss and share thoughts and resources on.

There are LOTS of education-related chats to follow. I actually have a tough time keeping up with #edchat. #sschat happens Monday nights at 7pm; so does #engchat (who featured guest Tweeter Diane Ravitch tonight!)

Cybraryman also has lots of Twitter resources, including a list of all the educational chats on Twitter.

It takes a bit of getting used to, but don’t give up. I’ve gotten tons of great resources from educators on Twitter.

WaPo: Va. Board of Education urges policy on social networking as teaching tools ⇢

Kimiya Haghighi, 17, had a prose problem. As much as her teachers preached concise writing, her sentences remained long and overwrought — the words poured out, unpunctuated, one after another.

Then Aubrey Ludwig, her 11th-grade English teacher at Langley High School, introduced her class to Twitter, requiring that students tweet their responses to a Hemingway assignment in 140 characters or less. Suddenly, Haghighi’s writing was efficient, declarative, even staccato. “It was a total breakthrough,” she said.

Such assignments are coming under new scrutiny as Virginia and other states consider restricting how teachers and students interact on social-networking platforms such as Facebook, MySpace and Twitter. Officials want to preserve the educational opportunity offered by Ludwig and other teachers but also want to prevent sexual predators from exploiting the casual tone of such sites to build rapport with potential victims.

Ultimate Twitter Guidebook for Teachers ⇢

About

Who I am: A fourth year high school history teacher at an urban(ish) high school in New Jersey.

What I blog about: Stuff related to education I like, and stuff I hope can help other teachers out. Technology, deals on supplies, helpful books. My focus lately is on educational technology & related resources. Occasionally, I also post things related to education reform. Because I post articles that I feel will be of interest to teachers with varying views, the political-related posts made here do not necessarily reflect my beliefs or opinions, nor do they reflect the beliefs of my employer.

What I like learning & reading about: Other teacher's opinions about and experiences with teaching & education. How I can enrich my classroom and reach out to my students. If you write about this stuff, let me know, because I probably want to read it.

What you should submit: Anything that could help a teacher.


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