Things for Teachers

What happened this summer?

I completely dropped off the face of the Internet (sans the occasional Facebooking). 

Life got the better of me, Tumblr. Things for Teachers was an easy routine for me to continue until May hit. I was still teaching through mid-June, but I decided to start grad classes and my summer job around the same time mid-May. One week, I worked 30 hours outside of teaching- and still had schoolwork to do.

Summer came and I kept thinking, “I’ll have more time next week.” With my part-time job, grad school, and a month-long moving process that consisted of a million shopping trips (I needed to furnish an apartment!) my summer seemed scheduled down to the minute. 

My last class of the summer ended a week or so ago, around the same time I finally finished moving. I’ve had a little more time to reflect on teaching and think about the upcoming school year (plus received some encouraging words from mikemewborne). School starts in two weeks here in Southern NJ. Throughout the summer, I was invited to do a couple of workshops at school- and I know it was because of my involvement in new technology last year. 

This will be my third year teaching, and I still feel like a new teacher striving to become a better teacher. I have been thinking about how I grow as a teacher and I realized in this thought process that I can’t abandon Tumblr because this IS my process of becoming a better teacher. Tumblr motivates me to read my RSS feed, check Twitter out, and pass on new things to all of you. 

School starts in 2 weeks. My next grad class starts in 1. I will still be working part-part-time outside of school. But, I resolve that I will try my hardest to stick around here. 

Earthquake in NJ?

I don’t know if I will ever feel that again!

Tales of an 8th Grade Teacher: Back to School Reflections: What makes you nervous? ⇢

talesofan8thgradeteacher:

As the school year approaches for me, I always start to get nervous. I work very hard and always try to do my best, but I still worry about a multitude of things.

  • Am I prepared? Am I ready to meet every day and challenge head on?
  • Am I growing as an educator? Can I be doing more to develop as a…

learning & laughing: I was given an interesting opportunity earlier this week. ⇢

kicksandgiggles:

On Wednesday, I attended “teacher transfer day” with the principal and a veteran teacher at my school. This is a day of mass interviews for all tenured employees wishing to change schools. Oddly enough, I assisted in interviewing these people.

At first, I was confused. I wasn’t quite sure why I…

BREAKING: iTunes App Store launches "Apps for Teachers" section ⇢
iPads for Learning Getting Started

world-shaker:

Oh look. A free, professionally designed booklet of classroom ideas for teaching and learning with iPads. And you can download it.

Thank you to everyone who makes incredible things like this, and then gives them away. You’re outstanding.

You can also find it here if you don’t want to read it as an embedded thing.

world-shaker:

Why Twitter is a Teacher’s Best Friend:
As a classroom teacher I remember going across the hall to ask Mr.  Sally for tips on getting kids to learn their times tables. His ideas  were fine, but what if I’d been able to crowdsource my question to the  global community of educators on Twitter? A teacher who engages with  other educators on Twitter essentially has a 24/7 open door policy. Type  the hashtag #edchat in the search box, and you’ll see a real-time  stream of discussion about an unlimited number of educational topics.  It’s pretty clear teachers are collaborating with each other by sharing  solutions to their challenges—links to articles, resources and practical  ideas:
(via Why Twitter Is a Teacher’s Best Tool - Education - GOOD)

world-shaker:

Why Twitter is a Teacher’s Best Friend:

As a classroom teacher I remember going across the hall to ask Mr. Sally for tips on getting kids to learn their times tables. His ideas were fine, but what if I’d been able to crowdsource my question to the global community of educators on Twitter? A teacher who engages with other educators on Twitter essentially has a 24/7 open door policy. Type the hashtag #edchat in the search box, and you’ll see a real-time stream of discussion about an unlimited number of educational topics. It’s pretty clear teachers are collaborating with each other by sharing solutions to their challenges—links to articles, resources and practical ideas:

(via Why Twitter Is a Teacher’s Best Tool - Education - GOOD)

Doodle- Easy Group Scheduling ⇢

If you have trouble coming up with a meeting time that works for multiple people, this tool may help you out. Click the link to read Richard Byrne’s post about it.

77 Web Resources for Teachers to Try This Summer ⇢

Via Free Tech for Teachers.

How my ninth-grade English classes evaluated me this year ⇢

I always appreciate Larry Ferlazzo’s reflections. Here, he shares his student evaluations as well as other resources about having your students evaluate you or evaluating yourself as a teacher. Even if you have already ended this school year, this may give you ideas for next year. I’m always interested in seeing what kinds of questions other teachers ask their students in teacher evaluation surveys.

About

Who I am: A fourth year high school history teacher at an urban(ish) high school in New Jersey.

What I blog about: Stuff related to education I like, and stuff I hope can help other teachers out. Technology, deals on supplies, helpful books. My focus lately is on educational technology & related resources. Occasionally, I also post things related to education reform. Because I post articles that I feel will be of interest to teachers with varying views, the political-related posts made here do not necessarily reflect my beliefs or opinions, nor do they reflect the beliefs of my employer.

What I like learning & reading about: Other teacher's opinions about and experiences with teaching & education. How I can enrich my classroom and reach out to my students. If you write about this stuff, let me know, because I probably want to read it.

What you should submit: Anything that could help a teacher.


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